Bioflavinoid-rich Foods

  • Red Bell Peppers or Sweet Peppers – According to some sources, red peppers contain three times more vitamin C than orange juice. Raw bell peppers are a safe and effective way to increase bioflavinoids in your diet.
  • Strawberries and other berries are a great source of bioflavinoids. Claims of health benefits for berry-made wines and derivative foods are also prevalent. Just be sure that the derivative foods are not also highly processed or high in sugar.
  • Citrus Fruits – Lemons, limes, peaches, nectarines and other fruits all contain vitamin C and bioflavonoid superoxidants, with oranges and grapefruit high on the list.
  • Broccoli – A great source of vitamin C as well as some other essential vitamins, use it raw for best results.
  • Brussels sprouts – Include these vegetables that are rich in antioxidants to get bioflavinoids and vitamins. If you have never enjoyed Brussels sprouts because you have always used the frozen variety, you are in for a treat if you will try fresh ones. Sweet, delicious and tender, they are great either steamed or seared in a skillet with caramelized onions. For the latter preparation, cut in half lengthwise and place facedown in the skillet in which you caramelized the onions, until lightly seared.
  • Tropical Fruits – Exotic fruits, like mangoes and papayas, are becoming more accessible at supermarkets everywhere. Do not miss out on what they have to offer—a powerful punch of bioflavinoids.
  • Garlic – We food culture have long been aware of garlic’s  anti-inflammatory properties, but now scientists are making this super food known as a natural food rich in bioflavinoids.
  • Spinach – This green vegetable rich in antioxidants is a good all-purpose nutrient – try it in place of lettuce for a salad that is bursting with nutrition, or boost the nutrition of soups and stews with it.
  • Teas – Green tea is known to have health benefits associated with bioflavinoids, and is generally caffeine-free. In addition, try red tea for quercetin, and even black tea has nutritional benefits.

In short, all the ‘health’ foods that pundits recommend are more often than not perfect for an anti-allergy diet.

Raw vs. Processed

As mentioned above in the Foods to Avoid section, highly processed foods have most of the beneficial nutrients removed in processing and are therefore nutritionally void if not frankly dangerous. Always bearing in mind that OAS would be an exception, your health, including allergy symptoms, will improve if you eat most fruits and vegetables raw rather than cooked. Always opt for the least processed of the choices you have in selecting a particular food, i.e. fresh rather than frozen, frozen over canned, whole-grain rather than refined.

Variety

Vary your food choices for better nutrition and avoidance of sensitization. Avoid eating any one food to the exclusion of all others or in excess (as in food addiction). Select foods according to the Stone Age diet; that is, the majority of your foods should be those prevalent among our Paleolithic ancestors. These included mostly fresh fruits and vegetables, fish and a little meat when it was available, along with some seeds. It definitely did NOT include processed grains or refined sugars.

This one practice alone will improve much more than your sensitivity to allergies; it will help regulate your blood sugar, reduce unhealthy stored fat, correct Candida yeast overgrowth, improve digestion to correct leaky gut syndrome and above all provide you with abundant energy.